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What Are Trucking Company Regulations in Canada?

The federal government largely determines regulations on trucking companies in Canada. Canadian regulations exist to make the country’s roads as safe as possible for all of its citizens.

A Brief History of Trucking Regulations in Canada

The history of trucking regulations starts with the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA). Created in 1985, CVSA is a cooperative effort between the United States and Canada to control trucking accidents. In 1988, fleets in both countries were required to adopt a standardized set of inspection decals for their trucks. CVSA then began developing a system that uses various criteria from these decals to score drivers on safety standards.

In 1995, mandatory federal inspections of all interstate commercial trucks began in the United States. All trucks are subject to inspection at least once per year, with some inspections being more thoroughly individualized. Canada followed suit later that same year with an aggressive trucking regulations program called CAN-PASS.

Regulations on trucking companies have been further expanded under Bill C-46, which calls for roadside inspections of both truck and truck drivers.

Key trucking regulations in Canada include:

  • Hours-of-service standards that limit driving time.
  • Mandatory alcohol screening tests for drivers.
  • Daily inspections of trucks.

The CAN-PASS program helps regulate trucking operations through a series of safety inspections administered by police officers trained in trucking procedures.

Truckers operating in Canada are governed by trucking regulations that control trucking hours of service, truck driver safety procedures, as well as truck inspection requirements.

Trucking Companies Hours-Of-Service Regulations In Canada

Federal trucking regulations in Canada include the Hours -of- Service Standards, limiting the amount of time a company truck or truck driver can spend behind the wheel. There are two trucking regulations under the Hours-of-Service Standards:

After a truck driver or truck company accumulates 14 total hours of on-duty time, they must take a mandatory 8-hour break before continuing trucking operations. If a trucker needs to be on duty for more than 16 hours, that trucker and truck company must take a minimum 24-hour break. These trucking regulations apply to all truckers regardless of their truckload or trucking industry classification.

Truck Driver Safety Procedures in Canada

Truck driver safety procedures in Canada include mandatory alcohol screening tests for truck drivers and random drug testing. Truck drivers who are found to have a blood alcohol concentration of 0.04 percent or higher are subject to trucking regulations that require them to participate in trucking industry programs that include truck driver education, rehab, and the installation of breathalyzers into their trucks.

Truck Driver Physical Wellness Testing

Truck drivers must undergo physical wellness testing before being allowed on the road. This trucking regulation requires truckers to have a physical examination from a doctor or medical professional that includes trucker height and weight, blood pressure, vision, truck driver hearing ability, and trucker heart health-related procedures. These trucking regulations are designed to keep the Canadian roads safe for everyone on them.

Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance

Trucking regulations in Canada have been strongly influenced by the United States’ trucking regulations, including those from the Commercial Vehicle Safety Association.

The Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) is a cooperative effort between the United States and Canada to control trucking accidents. In 1988, fleets in both countries were required to adopt a standardized set of inspection decals for their trucks. CVSA then began developing a system that uses various criteria from these decals to score truckers on safety standards during trucking inspections.

The CAN-PASS program was developed by the Canadian Trucking Alliance as part of an effort to reduce trucking accidents, which are responsible for 25 percent of all trucking accidents in Canada.

The trucking regulations that are part of the CAN-PASS program include:

  • Truck driver physical wellness testing.
  • Truck inspection requirements for truck companies.
  • Truck safety event reporting.
  • Roadside inspections of both truck drivers and truck companies.