Rivian Has Good News About Its EVs And Some Notsogood News About Its Factory Plans

In the last three months, Rivian has manufactured more than 7,000 electric vehicles and has confirmed its goal of manufacturing 25,000 vehicles by the end of the year. It was a sign that the company was turning away from its early mistakes in trying to dominate the electric vehicle market with beautifully crafted, emissions-free adventure trucks and SUVs.

The positive production report comes amid a less positive update on the electric car startup’s plans to build a $5 billion factory in Georgia. Last week, a judge ruled that the state Economic Development Authority did not justify using taxpayer-funded money to subsidize the project, casting doubt on the entire plan.

A judge blocked Rivian’s $1.5 billion tax subsidy plan.

Earlier this year, the Georgia government offered Rivian $1.5 billion in tax incentives for plans to build a plant east of Atlanta that will cost $5 billion to build and eventually produce 400,000 electric vehicles a year and employ more than 400,000 people. 7500 workers. Georgian officials called it the largest economic development deal in the state’s history.

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That plan is now in jeopardy after Ocmulgae Superior Court Chief Judge Brenda Holbert Trammell failed to prove that the plant required by state law is “adequate, reasonable and feasible.” He also agreed with a group of local residents who oppose the plan that the Rivian plant should not be exempt from local property taxes.

This was an unexpected result of what is believed to be a blanket request by local authorities to approve the bond deal. For the past year, Rivian’s plan to build a plant in Georgia has been a gamble in the state, where The New York Times reported that opponents are gathering, spreading conspiracy theories and even threatening local authorities.

Rivian declined to comment on the judge’s decision, referring the matter to the state Economic Development Board. A council spokesman said the group was exploring its “legal options”.

“As the nation as a whole seeks to revive and expand domestic manufacturing, protect American jobs, and secure the nation’s economic freedom, we are disappointed and respectfully disagree with Judge Trammell’s ruling,” he said. economic development. . . “We continue our efforts to create good paying American manufacturing jobs in Georgia and are currently evaluating all legal options.”

“We are disappointed and respectfully disagree with Judge Trammell’s decision.”

The Rivia deal has thrust Georgia into the spotlight, where several key political contests this year could decide which party controls Congress. For example, Georgia Governor Brian Kemp made the Treaty of Rivia a major campaign issue this year.

The Georgia plant is seen as central to Rivian’s plans to become a major player in the auto industry during the tectonic shift toward electric motors. The company remains the niche automaker so far, producing a total of 7,363 vehicles at its Illinois plant in the third quarter, of which 6,584 were delivered to customers. The company did not provide ventilation between the R1T truck and its electric van (EDV) under development for Amazon. (Delivery of the R1S SUV has been delayed until later this year.)

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