Neal Kwatra Comments on De Blasio’s Denouncement

 

Bill de Blasio by Gage Skidmore

New York City has already been under high stress during these past few months due to the COVID-19 pandemic, which took more than 21,000 lives. This immensely impacted the city’s economy and the municipal budget. However, the pressure did not stop for Mayor de Blasio as last Wednesday night’s curfew enforcement revealed police misconduct on peaceful protesters and civilians trying to get home. 

 

De Blasio deemed the new crisis of George Floyd’s death in addition to the coronavirus as “a perfect storm wrapped in another perfect storm.” On the opposite end, many others, including former advisors and council who worked for de Blasio, are stating the issue only further proves de Blasio’s incapability to handle his leadership position.  

Neal Kwatra was a former adviser to de Blasio and is the founder of Metropolitan Public Strategies (MPS), an innovative consulting agency that brings forth strategic consulting, communications, research, content creation, and advertising to create a successful campaign. Speaking on de Blasio’s current career path, Kwatra said, “The most charitable assessment is that his mayoralty is currently on life support.”

The curfew Mayor de Blasio administered only added to the heat of the controversy. Brian Higgins was once the police chief of Bergen County, New Jersey, and now teaches the subject of emergency management at John Jay College of Criminal Justice. He stated that the nature of enforcing a curfew that requires necessary “teeth behind it” would deepen conflict between protestors and police.

In his defense for supporting the implementation to be home by a required time, de Blasio said, “For anyone out there who is concerned or criticizing, I’m not sure they understand the depth of the reality of what we’ve faced. We have to keep the peace. We have to keep order. We have to protect our democracy and our democratic rights. We’re striking that balance all the time.”

However, the city of New York continued to amplify their dislike of de Blasio after witnessing police brutality on Wednesday night. The following day, the mayor attended and spoke at Floyd’s memorial service in Brooklyn with his wife, Chirlane McCray, who gave a speech, as well. There, from both the audience member and the stage, de Blasio received open criticism and was constantly interrupted while speaking. When introduced together, both de Blasio and McCray received boos. Yet, McCray was given no interruption while talking and was able to do so twice as long as de Blasio. 

Public advocate Jumaane Williams was welcomed with a favorable crowd while present at the memorial. He stated that there is the “wrong” leadership in all city, state, and federal governments for these types of times. He said he wishes that New York City’s mayor and the governor would put more effort “into protecting the lives of black people” rather than property. 

Mayor de Blasio’s press secretary, Freddi Goldstein, responded to the incident at the memorial and said, “The mayor was there to pay his respects and listen. It doesn’t take much time to say, ‘We hear you, and there will be change.’ That’s what he did.”

New York City has already been under high stress during these past few months due to the COVID-19 pandemic, which took more than 21,000 lives and immensely impacted the city’s economy and the municipal budget. However, the pressure did not stop for Mayor de Blasio as last Wednesday night’s curfew enforcement revealed police misconduct on peaceful protesters and civilians trying to get home. 

 

De Blasio deemed the new crisis of George Floyd’s death in addition to the coronavirus as “a perfect storm wrapped in another perfect storm.” On the opposite end, many others, including former advisors and council who worked for de Blasio, are stating the issue only further proves de Blasio’s incapability to handle his leadership position.  

 

Neal Kwatra was a former adviser to de Blasio and is the founder of Metropolitan Public Strategies (MPS), an innovative consulting agency that brings forth strategic consulting, communications, research, content creation, and advertising to create a successful campaign. Speaking on de Blasio’s current career path, Kwatra said, “The most charitable assessment is that his mayoralty is currently on life support.”

The curfew Mayor de Blasio administered only added to the heat of the controversy. Brian Higgins was once the police chief of Bergen County, New Jersey, and now teaches the subject of emergency management at John Jay College of Criminal Justice. He stated that the nature of enforcing a curfew that requires necessary “teeth behind it” would deepen conflict between protestors and police.

In his defense for supporting the implementation to be home by a required time, de Blasio said, “For anyone out there who is concerned or criticizing, I’m not sure they understand the depth of the reality of what we’ve faced. We have to keep the peace. We have to keep order. We have to protect our democracy and our democratic rights. We’re striking that balance all the time.”

However, the city of New York continued to amplify their dislike of de Blasio after witnessing police brutality on Wednesday night. The following day, the mayor attended and spoke at Floyd’s memorial service in Brooklyn with his wife, Chirlane McCray, who gave a speech, as well. There, from both the audience member and the stage, de Blasio received open criticism and was constantly interrupted while speaking. When introduced together, both de Blasio and McCray received boos. Yet, McCray was given no interruption while talking and was able to do so twice as long as de Blasio. 

Public advocate Jumaane Williams was welcomed with a favorable crowd while present at the memorial. He stated that there is the “wrong” leadership in all city, state, and federal governments for these types of times. He said he wishes that New York City’s mayor and the governor would put more effort “into protecting the lives of black people” rather than property. 

Mayor de Blasio’s press secretary, Freddi Goldstein, responded to the incident at the memorial and said, “The mayor was there to pay his respects and listen. It doesn’t take much time to say, ‘We hear you, and there will be change.’ That’s what he did.”

About Neal Kwatra

Neal Kwatra made history in his first year running Metropolitan Public Strategies (MPS) when leading Ken Thompson to victory as the first-ever African American to be elected Brooklyn District Attorney and the first challenger to defeat an incumbent D.A. in more than 100 years in Kings County.

Photo credit:

Gage Skidmore / CC BY-SA (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)