How to introduce game-based learning into your classroom

There are many studies on game-based learning that demonstrate the benefits of using games to improve and reinforce the classroom curriculum. Lido learning is doing the same such that Game-based learning can keep children motivated and engaged, can reduce student attention deficits, and can support creativity, different learning styles , and strategic thinking skills. According to a study in the Journal of Learning, Media and Technology, game-based learning can also improve the ability to store and recall information.

Despite all of the upsides, many teachers hesitate to bring game-based learning into the classroom because they are scared of wasting class time or losing control of the class. The logistics of using games to run smoothly within a lesson plan can get overwhelming- there isn’t enough time and too many logistical issues to make game-based learning a consistent part of class time teaching at lido classes.

4 steps to get started with the game-based learning

The easiest way to bring game-based learning into your curriculum is to have a plan and a clearly defined goal. There is nothing wrong with adding a game as a last-minute afterthought to fill time in your lesson plan – this can be fun for you and your students and give the mind a quick break from the material at hand. However, it is important to be systematic and consistent to get the most from game-based learning. Here are our top four tips for incorporating games into your lesson plans in a beneficial manner:

Decide why and how you want to use the game

As with most educational practices, the why and how should come before what. Don’t start the process by looking for a game to play, start by asking yourself why you are using the game in the first place. What do you hope to achieve? How will the game help you achieve your goals?

Refine your search by first deciding how you want to use the game:

There are many studies on game-based learning that demonstrate the benefits of using games to improve and reinforce the classroom curriculum. Lido learning is doing the same such that Game-based learning can keep children motivated and engaged, can reduce student attention deficits, and can support creativity, different learning styles , and strategic thinking skills. According to a study in the Journal of Learning, Media and Technology, game-based learning can also improve the ability to store and recall information.

Despite all of the upsides, many teachers hesitate to bring game-based learning into the classroom because they are scared of wasting class time or losing control of the class. The logistics of using games to run smoothly within a lesson plan can get overwhelming- there isn’t enough time and too many logistical issues to make game-based learning a consistent part of class time teaching at lido classes.

4 steps to get started with the game-based learning

The easiest way to bring game-based learning into your curriculum is to have a plan and a clearly defined goal. There is nothing wrong with adding a game as a last-minute afterthought to fill time in your lesson plan – this can be fun for you and your students and give the mind a quick break from the material at hand. However, it is important to be systematic and consistent to get the most from game-based learning. Here are our top four tips for incorporating games into your lesson plans in a beneficial manner:

Decide why and how you want to use the game

As with most educational practices, the why and how should come before what. Don’t start the process by looking for a game to play, start by asking yourself why you are using the game in the first place. What do you hope to achieve? How will the game help you achieve your goals?

Refine your search by first deciding how you want to use the game:

  • Introduction. Many teachers use a simple, quick game to introduce a new topic at the beginning of a lesson. These types of games make great digital bell ringers for your class, piquing the student’s curiosity before the lesson begins. Look for one-off games, like Daily Challenges or Quizzes, that change content every time you log in (or that allow you to customize content) rather than progressive games where student performance builds over multiple game sessions.
  • Redevelopment. Do you have a student or group of students struggling with a core concept? You can consider using some focused playtime to strengthen student skills. In this case, you should choose a game that allows for individual play and adaptive learning by automatically adjusting the difficulty as the student masters the material. Choose digital games that are readily available at home so that students can get advanced practice.
  • Improvement. If you think your entire class is familiar with the concept you are teaching, bring a game that presents the material through a variety of interactive media. For example, you can choose a game that raises questions and challenges through music, videos, pictures, or even puzzles. Bringing in games that improve the learning experience not only makes the content more interesting, it also teaches students that there are multiple ways to learn, approach problems, and find solutions. If you’re looking for a game to improve your lesson plan, look for something with multiple levels, specific challenges, or different paths through the game. Online scavenger hunts, multimedia quizzes, online simulations, and Ongoing challenges are all great ways to get your students engaged and improve your lessons.
  • Over. Make game-based learning an entire class activity or a group activity using games to review and reinforce learning. Some free, online gaming resources like Kahoot! even export verification results so teachers can use the games as a formative assessment.