How Much Does It Cost to Replaster a Pool?

This can be done to fix cracks or other damages or simply to give your pool a fresh, new look. Replastering, like most home repairs, doesn’t come cheap, but it can This can be done to fix cracks or other damages or simply to give your pool a fresh, new look. Replastering, like most home repairs, doesn’t come cheap, but it can be done in two ways: by hiring someone else to do it or by doing it yourself with instructions from an experienced plasterer like Pool Plastering Inc. In either case, it’s important to know exactly how much it costs to replaster a pool

Not all pools are replasterable

Before you consider replastering your pool, it’s important to know that not all pools are even replasterable. If you have an older swimming pool, chances are it was created using concrete (or some other non-recycled material) and is quite fragile. In some cases, attempting to repair such an old pool will only make matters worse; in others, there may be no fixing it at all.

General costs of replastering

You’ll likely have to hire a contractor for pool replastering, and costs can vary significantly based on location, size of your pool, and quality of materials. A common ballpark range for labor is about $4-$6 per square foot for plaster removal and replacement in medium-sized pools (25-50 feet). For an Olympic-size pool (50+ feet), expect costs closer to $6-$8 per square foot.

What is included in price quotes?

First, you must understand what price quotes include and what they don’t. Prices will vary depending on how large or small your pool is and if you want just retouching or complete plaster replacement. In most cases, a complete retouch job should cost between $1,500 and $3,000. If you are looking for an exact quote then be sure to request one in writing before any work begins so there are no surprises when it comes time to pay up.

How long does it take to replaster a pool?

If you’re not experienced in replastering, it can be hard to know how long it will take. This is due to many variables such as plaster mix, pool size, pool preparation, and your experience level. A competent professional should have a ballpark estimate of around 1 – 2 weeks (unless he or she does it every day). Of course, if you want things done more quickly you can always pay for expedited service.

Common problems replastered pools face

The most common problems replastered pools face are leaks, cracking, and other damage. While you’re doing your research, take a look at our guide to swimming pool leaks for more on identifying these issues. If you find that your pool has sustained some serious damage, professional replastering may be in order. Of course, there’s no need to go into debt when you can learn how to replaster your pool with our handy how-to guide: everything from preparing the surface of your pool and mixing plaster powder to brushing it on smoothly is covered in detail. But what should you expect if you decide to go ahead with professional work rather than saving money and doing it yourself?

Tips on how to prepare your pool before work begins

Take note of which parts need work is it just your pool deck, or are their cracks in your concrete walls, Check with your local pool store for discounts on supplies and services if you buy their chemicals or new equipment. Ask about maintenance plans; some companies offer free replastering every few years if you subscribe to a service agreement that also covers other basic repairs. Get More Info From Skills Media

Where should you begin looking for companies to replaster your pool?

One of your first steps when you’re looking into replastering your pool is identifying all possible locations where companies could be found. To help make your search even easier, we’ve compiled lists of websites related to pool supplies and contractor directory listings online. Of course, it never hurts to do some old-fashioned word-of-mouth research; talk with other homeowners in your area about which businesses they have had success with in past projects.

Conclusion

Replastering pools in general is not particularly expensive. If you are replacing your pool, on average it can cost up to $60,000 per pool but can go as high as $100,000. Pools that have been damaged and need additional plaster may be more costly than those that don’t have any damage at all. However, adding a new pool in or near an existing one can vary in cost dramatically depending on how much landscaping needs to be done and if hardscapes such as retaining walls or land grading are needed for drainage purposes.

Ellen Hollington

Ellen Hollington is a freelance writer who offers to ghostwrite, copywriting, and blogging services. She works closely with B2C and B2B businesses providing digital marketing content that gains social media attention and increases their search engine visibility.