How Can Anxiety Manifest?

A lot of people talk about their various anxiety problems and the anxiety they are feeling, but it’s really more of an umbrella term for a lot more specific things that can happen. For residents of Victoria, it’s best to find anxiety treatment in Melbourne and try to work through the issues that you’re facing, but first of all it’s critically important to also understand what anxiety really is and how it manifests itself.

Below are some of the most common ways that anxiety spills over from the subconscious into a real-world behaviour or event.

1. Panic Attacks

Panic attacks are hard to define in absolute terms since people may experience them in differing degrees and with different symptoms from a huge range of possibilities. Typical symptoms of a panic attack include a highly elevated and pounding heart rate, chilled sweating, trouble breathing, feelings of weakness, dizziness or nausea, trembling, numbness in the extremities, and sometimes even chest and stomach pains.

Panic attacks can be doubly harmful as for those who might not be in good physical health they could mistake it for a heart attack or stroke, thus creating further worry, like adding petrol to a fire.

2. Intense Worry About Social Situations

Do you have a social event coming up — a dinner party, house party, friends’ birthdays or anniversaries? — and you’re simply dreading having to go? You might feel worried about the way you look, how you’ll behave, that others are looking at you and judging you. You might feel anxious about the venue, the number of people, about getting into an embarrassing situation, the list is endless.

It doesn’t have to be something private like a birthday party, either. It could be anxiety about going to public spaces like parks, bars, clubs, restaurants and more. High levels of anxiety can make all such experiences very worrisome to some people.

3. Perinatal Depression

It’s normal for expecting mums and dads to be nervous about the arrival of their new baby, but when typical nervousness elevates into full-blown anxiety, it takes on a whole new life of its own. It even can continue after the child is born and create serious depression, which is potentially harmful both to parents and children.

4. Phobias

What starts as ongoing anxiety can become a full-on irrational phobia over time. Phobias are very real to the people who experience them, but are often hard to communicate to others. Certain phobias have become “understood” by the wider population who can empathize — claustrophobia, for instance, since it’s very easy to grasp why people feel trapped in enclosed spaces — where others can become the subject of ridicule for how apparently “crazy” they are. To the holder of that phobia, however, the terror is just as real as anything that might scare a typical person.

5. Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD)

Apparently, about 14 percent of the population of Australia every year experiences an anxiety condition of some sort, and about 3 percent GAD. About 1 in 16 Australians will experience GAD at some point in their lifetime. 

GAD is typically connected with persistently high levels of anxiety that are often coupled with physical symptoms such as muscle fatigue and difficulty holding one’s attention on any one task. It’s when periods of anxiety start to become connected by shorter and shorter gaps of serenity in between and the anxious feelings take over as the “default” setting when experts consider GAD to be setting in.

One Thing Manifest Anxiety Has in Common – The Need for Help

Some people believe they’ll just take on their anxiety alone and triumph. In some cases, people do, but for many what really helps is having both a professional and personal network of support to help overcome feelings of loneliness and isolation. One should never be afraid to reach out and ask for help.

A lot of people talk about their various anxiety problems and the anxiety they are feeling, but it’s really more of an umbrella term for a lot more specific things that can happen. For residents of Victoria, it’s best to find anxiety treatment in Melbourne and try to work through the issues that you’re facing, but first of all it’s critically important to also understand what anxiety really is and how it manifests itself.

Below are some of the most common ways that anxiety spills over from the subconscious into a real-world behaviour or event.

1. Panic Attacks

Panic attacks are hard to define in absolute terms since people may experience them in differing degrees and with different symptoms from a huge range of possibilities. Typical symptoms of a panic attack include a highly elevated and pounding heart rate, chilled sweating, trouble breathing, feelings of weakness, dizziness or nausea, trembling, numbness in the extremities, and sometimes even chest and stomach pains.

Panic attacks can be doubly harmful as for those who might not be in good physical health they could mistake it for a heart attack or stroke, thus creating further worry, like adding petrol to a fire.

2. Intense Worry About Social Situations

Do you have a social event coming up — a dinner party, house party, friends’ birthdays or anniversaries? — and you’re simply dreading having to go? You might feel worried about the way you look, how you’ll behave, that others are looking at you and judging you. You might feel anxious about the venue, the number of people, about getting into an embarrassing situation, the list is endless.

It doesn’t have to be something private like a birthday party, either. It could be anxiety about going to public spaces like parks, bars, clubs, restaurants and more. High levels of anxiety can make all such experiences very worrisome to some people.

3. Perinatal Depression

It’s normal for expecting mums and dads to be nervous about the arrival of their new baby, but when typical nervousness elevates into full-blown anxiety, it takes on a whole new life of its own. It even can continue after the child is born and create serious depression, which is potentially harmful both to parents and children.

4. Phobias

What starts as ongoing anxiety can become a full-on irrational phobia over time. Phobias are very real to the people who experience them, but are often hard to communicate to others. Certain phobias have become “understood” by the wider population who can empathize — claustrophobia, for instance, since it’s very easy to grasp why people feel trapped in enclosed spaces — where others can become the subject of ridicule for how apparently “crazy” they are. To the holder of that phobia, however, the terror is just as real as anything that might scare a typical person.

5. Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD)

Apparently, about 14 percent of the population of Australia every year experiences an anxiety condition of some sort, and about 3 percent GAD. About 1 in 16 Australians will experience GAD at some point in their lifetime. 

GAD is typically connected with persistently high levels of anxiety that are often coupled with physical symptoms such as muscle fatigue and difficulty holding one’s attention on any one task. It’s when periods of anxiety start to become connected by shorter and shorter gaps of serenity in between and the anxious feelings take over as the “default” setting when experts consider GAD to be setting in.

One Thing Manifest Anxiety Has in Common – The Need for Help

Some people believe they’ll just take on their anxiety alone and triumph. In some cases, people do, but for many what really helps is having both a professional and personal network of support to help overcome feelings of loneliness and isolation. One should never be afraid to reach out and ask for help.